Invisalign® Invisible Braces

Invisalign® is an orthodontic treatment that uses a series of clear, custom-crafted mouthpieces to gradually guide teeth into proper alignment. The mouthpieces are worn at least 22 hours a day, to be removed only while eating meals, brushing, and flossing. Check out invisalign family braces

Ideal Candidates

It may surprise you to learn that many of the same characteristics that would make you a candidate for traditional orthodontics also make you a candidate for Invisalign®. Before proceeding with Invisalign®, your orthodontist will conduct a thorough examination of your smile to determine if these clear plastic mouthpieces will be effective in giving you the straighter, healthier smile you desire.

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Virtually Invisible Treatment

One of the most distinguishing characteristics of an Invisalign® candidate is a desire not to sport a mouthful of conspicuous metal appliances for a year or more. Today, traditional braces are a common and accepted rite of passage for many adolescents. But because metal braces are so closely associated with adolescence, adults who desire a straighter smile often find themselves feeling reluctant to take the traditional route. As Invisalign® has gained popularity, many adolescents have also chosen the less conspicuous alternative. The bottom line: if you have your adult teeth, you are unhappy with the alignment of your teeth, and you do not wish to wear orthodontic appliances that draw attention, you may be a good candidate for Invisalign®.

A Range of Treatable Cases

If you have severe alignment or bite issues, extraction, or even jaw surgery, may be necessary to correct your bite. Generally speaking, however, many of the same cases that would traditionally call for metal braces are treatable using Invisalign®. These cases include:

  • Gapped Teeth: Abnormal growth of the jawbone can result in wide gaps between the teeth. Wide spacing can also make it easier for bacteria to collect below the gum line, increasing your risk of gum disease.
  • Underbite: Improper jaw development, genetics, bad oral habits and other conditions can cause the top teeth to bite behind the bottom teeth. An underbite can cause excessive wear and tear on your teeth, as well as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems.
  • Overbite: Many of the same complications that can occur as a result of an underbite can happen if your top teeth bite over the lower teeth.
  • Crowded Teeth: If your jaw lacks the room needed to properly accommodate your teeth, crowding can occur. Left untreated, crowding only worsens, increasing your risk of plaque accumulation, gum disease and tooth decay.
  • Open Bite: Some teeth may not be able to make physical contact with an opposing tooth because of genetics, or thumb sucking. An open bite can cause speech impairment, or make chewing painful. TMJ disorder is also a risk of an open bite.
  • Crossbite: If the lower and upper jaws do not meet properly, it can cause pronounced wear and tear on the teeth, and increase your risk of TMJ disorder.